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Restoring during the summer?

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  • Restoring during the summer?

    So now that it's getting warmer I'm not able to wear jeans/pants for the majority of the time which hides my tugging (tlc-x). I've been tugging when home and on the days I can wear pants however, how do you all combat being able to tug with warm weather and shorts? As this is my first warm season tugging.

  • #2
    Tug when you can. If you have enough skin to do it safely, you can tug at night wile you sleep. Up over the shoulder, of course.

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    • #3
      One thing you can try:

      I read this on the old forum: Use an elastic strap. Fasten the far end of the strap around your knee (below the kneecap). Wear one of those elastic sleeve-type knee brace around the knee to hide the strap. The strap will slowly back off, around your knee, but this isn't quite the problem it sounds like; one application of tension, and the lessening of that tension equals one "cycle". Just bend down and tug the strap back around your knee. This is a convenient way to reapply tension that doesn't involve zippers : ) Cycles of tension are one of the keys.

      I'm not the shy type, so when I used a canister/strap, and wore shorts (some days are triple digits, where I live) I just wore the strap without the knee brace. It looked like a patellar strap that runners wear, and the visible "up" portion of the strap was mostly hidden by the shorts leg, so no big deal. Nobody ever said anything, and anyhow, people are too busy with their own problems to notice.

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      • #4
        I have found that there is no need for me to apply tension for long periods. I make great progress with just 20 minutes, twice a day. I tug while eating my breakfast and dinner. When I am out of the house, I am not tugging, so can wear anything.

        Regards

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        • #5
          In fact I agree with you. I ended use of a canister almost two years before I considered myself done. During that time I used manual exclusively. Did it get me there more quickly? I have no idea; no way to apply science to it. And, no real desire to do that.

          Off and on I've been patrolling through the internet trying to find some mention of the two basic skin expansion parameters that probably won't, but might, carry over to what we do. They are: duration of force applied (in seconds or minutes, ideally), and amount of force applied. Scientific research always uses units of measure different from what we use. So far I've only found a mention of tension force in one experiment (which used equipment we don't have), and I had to google for the equivalent, which was approximately 35 ounces of tension.

          Duration has been a shyer beastie, haven't found anything yet, but I remember that old experiment that focused on using papaverine hcl, and I think I remember that they used cycles of about 22 minutes per. But don't quote me because memory isn't science. I believe it was that same experiment that found that those bio chemicals which began the mitotic process came to a grinding halt with a force applied for longer periods of time. How much time, I don't remember. But I'm not sure that matters, if 22 minutes (or whatever) was found to be optimum for their experiment. Does that carry over? I don't know, but maybe.

          Your 20 minutes, and the remembered 22 minutes parallel each other. Interesting. They used multiple 22 minute (or whatever) cycles. and you use two cycles. Or two events, I should say; you may apply cycles within each 20 minute event (you didn't say). And, of course, they weren't using shaft skin per se, or mucosa at all , and they were using sophisticated lab equipment. So you can see how vague all this gets, pretty quick.

          So for now I have to say, sorry folks for this being a more or less empty post (except for that "35 ounces". Maybe : )); I'll keep looking for units of force applied. It may be that I missed it when I was reading the studies; that stuff gets very technical, but it's interesting. Example: human epidermis has a "locking" point, and this is important because in order to get any increase in mitosis (skin growth) you have to break through that locking point, but without damaging the tissue, of course. That vaguely implies the "sweet spot". Does 35 ounces or so break through the locking point? I'll have to read it again. Another example: they found, as did other experiments, that skin does not ever grow in a linear fashion; it grows "in place", here and there, cell by cell. So: not linear in the sense of 'from here to there', and not linear in the sense of constant; it happens only here and there and 'now and then'. There are also what are called Langer's lines, which human epidermis tends to follow when force is applied (pregnant ladies' bellies, for instance) but I hesitate to even mention this because from what I can tell the Langer lines for the penis are circumferential, and I have no idea what that means for us, other than that being another fact that doesn't carry over to what we do. It was notable for the research, but I doubt it is for us.

          But if you're trying devices during your day, and you're outside, and it's hot, there are ways.........
          Last edited by Reality; 04-18-2017, 10:34 PM.

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          • #6
            I wore the CAT II Q with shorts for many summers and no one was any the wiser as to what was going on. The device is not heavy, has a slim profile and works without straps.

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            • #7

              Originally posted by Info View Post
              In fact I agree with you. I ended use of a canister almost two years before I considered myself done. During that time I used manual exclusively. Did it get me there more quickly? I have no idea; no way to apply science to it. And, no real desire to do that.

              Off and on I've been patrolling through the internet trying to find some mention of the two basic skin expansion parameters that probably won't, but might, carry over to what we do. They are: duration of force applied (in seconds or minutes, ideally), and amount of force applied. Scientific research always uses units of measure different from what we use. So far I've only found a mention of tension force in one experiment (which used equipment we don't have), and I had to google for the equivalent, which was approximately 35 ounces of tension.

              Duration has been a shyer beastie, haven't found anything yet, but I remember that old experiment that focused on using papaverine hcl, and I think I remember that they used cycles of about 22 minutes per. But don't quote me because memory isn't science. I believe it was that same experiment that found that those bio chemicals which began the mitotic process came to a grinding halt with a force applied for longer periods of time. How much time, I don't remember. But I'm not sure that matters, if 22 minutes (or whatever) was found to be optimum for their experiment. Does that carry over? I don't know, but maybe.

              Your 20 minutes, and the remembered 22 minutes parallel each other. Interesting. They used multiple 22 minute (or whatever) cycles. and you use two cycles. Or two events, I should say; you may apply cycles within each 20 minute event (you didn't say). And, of course, they weren't using shaft skin per se, or mucosa at all , and they were using sophisticated lab equipment. So you can see how vague all this gets, pretty quick.

              ...
              Thank you for looking for science reports that might help us. That is a big help.

              While the 20 minute parallel is interesting, if they didn't actually test other time periods, then I would not put too much weight in it. They might have done what I did and simply chosen a convenient time length.

              I will note that manual restorers often use far shorter time periods, in terms of holding the tension. Mere minutes. I have seen no evidence of what a lower time limit might be, except through the reports of manual restorers, so my guess would be minutes is all you need.

              I hold the tension for the full 20 minutes. I should also say that 20 minutes is not a precise time, my times vary probably from 10 minutes to 30 minutes, but mostly hover around 20 minutes. And, at around the 20 minute mark, I often feel like my skin is ready for a break.

              I will also add that I started the 20 minutes twice a day routine when I started inflation. I use a blood pressure bulb for creating the tension, and that is a wonderful way to add air, adjust air, and release air. Very easy and precise. So I have fallen into the habit of "topping uop" the air, to reach a point where I can feel the tension a few times per 20 minute session.

              Regards

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