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  • Can every man really restore?

    I was just browsing the interweb and came across a blog that said that some men, despite their best efforts, are incapable of restoring due to collogan deficiency. If true, how rare is this?

    Also, if one were to repeatedly over tension their skin to the point of developing stretch marks, would it possibly grind their progress to a halt, or could they continue on, albeit at a slower pace?

  • #2
    I’ve heard from other restorers that they cannot grow a foreskin no matter how healthy of a lifestyle they lead, or the restoration techniques they use. I find this difficult to believe, but I take their word for it. The reason I find it difficult to believe is that we all regenerate tissue throughout all our lives, and foreskin restoration is just an enhanced form of forced tissue regeneration. Sometimes I wonder if those guys cannot grow a foreskin because they are not tensioning properly, still using the same device day in and day out without any other form of routine in the mix, or perhaps a nutritional deficiency. Nevertheless, those men with this type of issues seem to be few and far between.

    In reality and my personal opinion, many men do not have the discipline to keep up with the necessary tugging routines and techniques that will help them restore. The restoration process requires a lot of patience, dedication, and lots of skin pulling, and many just loose interest early on because they don’t see faster results. And this is unfortunate… Foreskin restoration is a rather slow process, but it can be done.

    Regarding stretch marks, if you tug your foreskin manually to the point in which the skin feels a slight burn, and no further, then you should not develop stretch marks. Those happen when you tug with a device too hard and for too long a session. You are better of tugging for very short sessions, as many times a day as possible. This form of cyclic tensioning done manually is much more effective than longer sessions fewer times a day done with devices.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Canadajuice View Post
      I was just browsing the interweb and came across a blog that said that some men, despite their best efforts, are incapable of restoring due to collogan deficiency. If true, how rare is this?

      Also, if one were to repeatedly over tension their skin to the point of developing stretch marks, would it possibly grind their progress to a halt, or could they continue on, albeit at a slower pace?
      To actually answer your questions: about 1 identified case in 400,000, with this overall syndrome.

      http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1114004-overview

      Stretch marks (a form of scar tissue) are also a feature of this syndrome, as well as a feature of other conditions. Stretch marks are common in darker skinned people. Not sure what you meant by "grind to a halt", but if you mean that a person stops tugging because stretch marks are appearing frequently, then sure, that person would probably stop. So is tugging for everyone? Nope.

      Methods or schedules have nothing to do with this. To think that it does, is to be ...unaware ... let's say, of the condition you asked about (collagen deficiency), so that's probably why you only received a non specific, agenda-answer thus far. There were several members of the old forum who complained about stretch marks, so.......it's a reality in the tugging world for a few.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Info View Post

        To actually answer your questions: about 1 identified case in 400,000, with this overall syndrome.

        http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1114004-overview

        Stretch marks (a form of scar tissue) are also a feature of this syndrome, as well as a feature of other conditions. Stretch marks are common in darker skinned people. Not sure what you meant by "grind to a halt", but if you mean that a person stops tugging because stretch marks are appearing frequently, then sure, that person would probably stop. So is tugging for everyone? Nope.

        Methods or schedules have nothing to do with this. To think that it does, is to be ...unaware ... let's say, of the condition you asked about (collagen deficiency), so that's probably why you only received a non specific, agenda-answer thus far. There were several members of the old forum who complained about stretch marks, so.......it's a reality in the tugging world for a few.
        By grind to a halt i meant that the stretch marks would damage the skin to the point of rendering it incapable of undergoing further mitosis. I don't have a background in the sciences, so any information is greatly appreciated. Thank you both.

        I'm still new to restoration, but i find the routine that I'm using easy to maintain and very convenient. Yes, it's very slow progress, but there is progress nonetheless.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Canadajuice View Post

          By grind to a halt i meant that the stretch marks would damage the skin to the point of rendering it incapable of undergoing further mitosis. I don't have a background in the sciences, so any information is greatly appreciated. Thank you both.

          I'm still new to restoration, but i find the routine that I'm using easy to maintain and very convenient. Yes, it's very slow progress, but there is progress nonetheless.
          Mitosis is mitosis, it already goes on daily because it's programmed to do this to maintain skin as the organ it is, and as we try to stimulate it beyond the daily rate, it happens very slowly, as it should (those implanted expanders commonly cause problems). So I suppose that might be good news for a person who develops stretch marks.

          But as to whether or not it's advisable to tug, the short answer is, I don't know for sure. I don't know of any reason why a person with stretch marks, and who develops stretch marks fairly easily, couldn't just go on, very carefully, and tug. But that's a more or less informed guess, not a guarantee, and that person might easily be disappointed with the cosmetic result. That person would need to exercise caution, needless to say. If that person has a diagnosed (or even a suspected) collagen deficiency then all bets are off, and I would personally suggest not tugging if that's the case. At least not until he ran it past his specialist.

          And...... if this is you we're talking about, then you need more information from a clinical provider regarding your personal condition, at least to rule out an underlying condition (if you are noticing symptoms). We all start from a different place.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Info View Post

            Mitosis is mitosis, it already goes on daily because it's programmed to do this to maintain skin as the organ it is, and as we try to stimulate it beyond the daily rate, it happens very slowly, as it should (those implanted expanders commonly cause problems). So I suppose that might be good news for a person who develops stretch marks.

            But as to whether or not it's advisable to tug, the short answer is, I don't know for sure. I don't know of any reason why a person with stretch marks, and who develops stretch marks fairly easily, couldn't just go on, very carefully, and tug. But that's a more or less informed guess, not a guarantee, and that person might easily be disappointed with the cosmetic result. That person would need to exercise caution, needless to say. If that person has a diagnosed (or even a suspected) collagen deficiency then all bets are off, and I would personally suggest not tugging if that's the case. At least not until he ran it past his specialist.

            And...... if this is you we're talking about, then you need more information from a clinical provider regarding your personal condition, at least to rule out an underlying condition (if you are noticing symptoms). We all start from a different place.
            Thank you for the information. And no, I do not suspect i have a collogan deficiency, i was just curious. I'll find the link to the forum that i was on and post it on this board so that people that are more knowledgable than i am can scan through it, disect it, and determine whether it's bunk science or not.

            Comment


            • #7
              Anyway, here's the link:

              http://forums.govteen.com/showthread...TION-QUESTIONS

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Canadajuice View Post
                What I've just read of (first few paragraphs) it is totally ridiculous, but I haven't read most of it. (Refreshing to see an illustration from the old TugAhoy site, though).

                When I get a chance...............

                Ok. Back, and in general order:

                1st paragraph: not true. Nobody applies "pressure on (your) shaft". That isn't how it works in any way, shape, or form. So: clueless.

                2nd: It's NOT a gamble depending on how thick your "skin" is. It may be a gamble only for those with a diagnosis of collagen deficiency, or one of a number of other conditions, most or all of which the individual tugging would be aware of if this included them. But this "article" seems to hang it all on collagen production which is nonsense. No science here. Period. The vast majority of people can tug. Collagen formation is a matter of course for us, because we necessarily go slow, and it's built into the overall mitotic system. If you understand the mitotic process, then you know that it extends to connective tissue, and the underlying vascular system.

                Their definition of what constitutes a test for "thick" and "thin" skin is ridiculous; made me laugh . It's on the level of a middle school myth out on the playground. Sad, really, But be that as it may, if you have "thick" skin, or "thin" skin, you can tug and expand shaft skin. The process of mitosis, again, is all built in naturally. And Jesus H., smegma? LOL That's the single most ignorant thing I've ever read on this general issue, and I've come across of lot of ignorance. Whoever wrote that is ...uh......without the least understanding of human physiology, purely and simply said Smegma is simply a mixture of water (which passed across your mucosal cells) and dead mucosal cells, and some bacteria eventually. Nothing magic, just crap given off by your body, and certainly not a TEST of something, other than being alive or dead haha. But what's really funny, this whole thing doesn't even answer it's own question, ie "does it work", so let me: Hell yes it works.

                3rd: Their definition of what makes up skin is false. Epithelial cells have NOTHING to do with the situation. We tug on the epidermis ("skin"), which is made up of a number of layers, the important one being the stratum basale (or stratum germinativum, your choice). Period.

                4th: Dermis: true, as far as the definition goes, although their point about damage to the dermis, as though you can get to it and somehow bypass damage to the overlying tissue is questionable. But here's the thing: it certainly has nothing to do with tugging, so why mention it? An amateurish attempt to impress the kids in the back seat? I'm beginning to wonder about the agenda here. Ah, wait. A site run by teens. It's all becoming clearer why this is all crap.

                5th: Deep fascia: My question is, what does that have to do with anything? It's never affected by tugging. Period.

                6th: Totally false. You are NOT "moving skin" from one area to another. We are growing additional skin, IN PLACE. Whoever wrote this does not understand what tugging is. Ignorance, in the attempted guise of "science". It's nonsense.

                7th: The two "best" methods? Nothing magic about methods, and there are many of them. If you knew anything about tugging you'd know that, at least. If a method places tension (not "pressure") on shaft skin (which is NOT more sensitive than any other skin, and is less sensitive than some other areas), then you're good to go.

                8th: Jesus. Again, the word "pressure" is used, relating it to damage. So I'm using my answering word; nonsense. There is no science here; only an attempt to sound "scientific". Tug with reasonable tension, don't rip anything, and you're fine. It's really just that simple. Trying to use a deep misunderstanding of DNA not only undercuts what this paragraph is trying to say in its clumsy way, it reveals that whoever wrote this has no understanding of anything to do with this entire subject. From this point on, the remaining "information" is written in poor language, with one error after another, and frankly I don't want to waste my time with it. All nonsense.

                So the upshot is: amateurish nonsense; doesn't even measure up to a passing term paper (not in any school I went to). Thing is, when something is written by a person who has no knowledge of either the subject of tugging, or basic human physiology, and who tries to describe the first, using an appeal to the second, they fail miserably. This "article" fails miserably. It had to be written by at least one high schooler who's doomed to repeat whatever grade they're in currently. And having read about who runs this site, it's all right there: middle school and high school; failing grade. Very disappointing that this is out there and that kids read it, but then it is the internet, where ignorance of even the basic issues rules, and the hope of being "popular" is everything.

                So, Candajuice, you wanted to know if this is bogus science. Short answer is, yes. Slightly longer answer is, it's not really science at all. And definitely bogus.
                Last edited by Info; 06-07-2016, 12:40 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Info View Post

                  What I've just read of (first few paragraphs) it is totally ridiculous, but I haven't read most of it. (Refreshing to see an illustration from the old TugAhoy site, though).

                  When I get a chance...............

                  Ok. Back, and in general order:

                  1st paragraph: not true. Nobody applies "pressure on (your) shaft". That isn't how it works in any way, shape, or form. So: clueless.

                  2nd: It's NOT a gamble depending on how thick your "skin" is. It may be a gamble only for those with a diagnosis of collagen deficiency, or one of a number of other conditions, most or all of which the individual tugging would be aware of if this included them. But this "article" seems to hang it all on collagen production which is nonsense. No science here. Period. The vast majority of people can tug. Collagen formation is a matter of course for us, because we necessarily go slow, and it's built into the overall mitotic system. If you understand the mitotic process, then you know that it extends to connective tissue, and the underlying vascular system.

                  Their definition of what constitutes a test for "thick" and "thin" skin is ridiculous; made me laugh . It's on the level of a middle school myth out on the playground. Sad, really, But be that as it may, if you have "thick" skin, or "thin" skin, you can tug and expand shaft skin. The process of mitosis, again, is all built in naturally. And Jesus H., smegma? LOL That's the single most ignorant thing I've ever read on this general issue, and I've come across of lot of ignorance. Whoever wrote that is ...uh......without the least understanding of human physiology, purely and simply said Smegma is simply a mixture of water (which passed across your mucosal cells) and dead mucosal cells, and some bacteria eventually. Nothing magic, just crap given off by your body, and certainly not a TEST of something, other than being alive or dead haha. But what's really funny, this whole thing doesn't even answer it's own question, ie "does it work", so let me: Hell yes it works.

                  3rd: Their definition of what makes up skin is false. Epithelial cells have NOTHING to do with the situation. We tug on the epidermis ("skin"), which is made up of a number of layers, the important one being the stratum basale (or stratum germinativum, your choice). Period.

                  4th: Dermis: true, as far as the definition goes, although their point about damage to the dermis, as though you can get to it and not bypass damage to the overlying tissue is questionable. But here's the thing: it certainly has nothing to do with tugging, so why mention it? An amateurish attempt to impress the kids in the back seat? I'm beginning to wonder about the agenda here. Ah, wait. A site run by teens. It's all becoming clearer why this is all crap.

                  5th: Deep fascia: My question is, what does that have to do with anything? It's never affected by tugging. Period.

                  6th: Totally false. You are NOT "moving skin" from one area to another. We are growing additional skin, IN PLACE. Whoever wrote this does not understand what tugging is. Ignorance, in the attempted guise of "science". It's nonsense.

                  7th: The two "best" methods? Nothing magic about methods, and there are many of them. If you knew anything about tugging you'd know that, at least. If a method places tension (not "pressure") on shaft skin (which is NOT more sensitive than any other skin, and is less sensitive than some other areas), then you're good to go.

                  8th: Jesus. Again, the word "pressure" is used, relating it to damage. So I'm using my answering word; nonsense. There is no science here; only an attempt to sound "scientific". Tug with reasonable tension, don't rip anything, and you're fine. It's really just that simple. Trying to use a deep misunderstanding of DNA not only undercuts what this paragraph is trying to say in its clumsy way, it reveals that whoever wrote this has no understanding of anything to do with this entire subject. From this point on, the remaining "information" is written in poor language, with one error after another, and frankly I don't want to waste my time with it. All nonsense.

                  So the upshot is: amateurish nonsense; doesn't even measure up to a passing term paper (not in any school I went to). Thing is, when something is written by a person who has no knowledge of either the subject of tugging, or basic human physiology, and who tries to describe the first, using an appeal to the second, they fail miserably. This "article" fails miserably. It had to be written by at least one high schooler who's doomed to repeat whatever grade they're in currently. And having read about who runs this site, it's all right there: middle school and high school; failing grade. Very disappointing that this is out there and that kids read it, but then it is the internet, where ignorance of even the basic issues rules, and the hope of being "popular" is everything.

                  So, Candajuice, you wanted to know if this is bogus science. Short answer is, yes. Slightly longer answer is, it's not really science at all. And definitely bogus.
                  Thanks for taking the time to go through that, really cleared up a lot of things.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You're welcome. If you choose to, feel free to use it as a responding post on that site.

                    Comment

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