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Suggestions for avoiding a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

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  • charlierichkid
    replied
    Just make a thorough clean to avoid it I guess

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  • bioprof12
    replied
    Bumping this...

    The importance of cleaning your device and your penis FREQUENTLY during restoration cannot be overstated. I've started restoring after a 5 year hiatus. Back then, I was very lax about cleaning my restoration gear/penis, and ended up on an IV in the hospital for a severe UTI.

    Water alone won't do it. It simply cannot adequately remove the bacteria that have collected on your device and penis. Worth noting that the bacteria that cause UTIs are everywhere; in the air, on your clothes, hands, etc. They're harmless, unless they find a warm, moist place inside your body with plenty of nutrients... in other words, your urinary tract.

    By their very shape, plunger type restoration devices apply force to the glans of the penis so as to slightly widen/open the meatus (pee hole) - an open door invitation for bacteria.

    To avoid a UTI, I recommend using a germicidal soap that is specially formulated for sensitive skin, such as Tattoo Goo's deep cleansing soap. Yes, it's made for new tattoos aftercare, but it is great for restoration, because it doesn't contain the harsh quaternary compounds of regular antimicrobial soaps, it is long-lasting and it is pH balanced to maintain the normal acid pH of the skin, which is a bactericidal environment.

    Wash your device, hands and penis each time you apply (or reapply) your device.

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  • z726
    replied
    If the urinary meatus is somehow pulled open while you're retaining, then it could easily raise the risk of infection. With a cone, cross tape, o-ring, or whatever else, you'll want to make sure that the skin isn't pulling on the sides of the glans and opening up the hole. Once the device is applied, check to see whether everything stays in place if you get a semi-erection.

    Of course, if you've been restoring without incident for 3 years, maybe that's not it. There are all kinds of possible causes; if your physician assistant couldn't offer any educated guesses, I doubt we could do any better. It could be anything, from swimming at a polluted beach to masturbating with dirty hands - say, for example, while sitting at the computer using a dirty keyboard.

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  • Tony
    replied
    We all should be cleaning our devices on a regular basis, and we probably don't do it enough. You could soak your device in a mild bleach solution, or wipe it with povidine scrub, or even wash it in your dishwasher. (The heat cycle kills bacteria).

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  • admin
    replied
    I clean my device with plain soap and a toothbrush while showering and I rinse it thoroughly and pat dry. Then I blow out any holes.

    I permit no soap or cleanser labeled "anti-bacterial" in my home.

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  • admin
    replied
    I had two UTI episodes (one required hospital treatment) in the 1990s before I ever restored. None since I started restoring. So much for circumcision protecting against UTIs.

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  • gdom
    replied
    I'm using the TLC tugger, cross taping, and the inflatable device I've forgotten it's name right now.

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  • Nomad
    replied
    Originally posted by gdom View Post
    I had several UTI requiring brief hospitalization using the DTR and I think this was party due to it causing irritation by pushing the glans within my body. I've discontinued use and no problem since.
    What methods you apply now...manual tugging?





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  • gdom
    replied
    I had several UTI requiring brief hospitalization using the DTR and I think this was party due to it causing irritation by pushing the glans within my body. I've discontinued use and no problem since.

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  • Nomad
    replied
    There are two conflicting camps here.....soap or no soap. I use sebamed liquid face and body wash (https://www.sebamedusa.com/sebamed-l...-and-body-wash) that is ph neutral 5.5 and no soap.

    I use it on my face so it should be fine with the glans right? Also does it eliminate bad bacteria and keeps it not dry?

    I want to have the best of both world and certainly getting UTI is scarry.

    Leave a comment:


  • elebrias
    replied
    I appreciate all of the comments! I think, going forward, I will be sure to (1) make sure there's no urine lingering, (2) periodically sanitize the pusher and cone, and (3) more thoroughly rinse the penis. Ron's website states to only use clear water to wash the tip of the penis, and I've read a bit about soap drying/not drying things out here, and IMO it's not going to do much harm if applied for just a moment. Much appreciated again, thank you all.

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  • Swingshiftworker
    replied
    It's nothing to brag about but I'm pretty lax when it comes to cleaning my Tugger and I've never had a UTI. Guess I'm just not as susceptible as others.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I'm with greg-b, personal practices beyond just equipment use are important, and I'll add, just washing your device surfaces (ALL of them) may not be enough in some cases.

    Certainly also wash your genitals (soap and water). The usual caution on forums, thankfully only from a few, against using soap (like it's the Great Satan rather than the Great Savior for everyone), can lead to exactly this kind of situation. Of course, if there's a signif. other in the picture then that person may be part of the UTI reservoir picture, but ... then it gets tricky. But you gotta know, or you'll head down that path again.

    If I were you, I'd also look into what was meant specifically by a "UTI" (this is more generic than specific). If it was actually a prostate infection, as an example, or one of the other adjacent organs which were involved, then you need to know that. In other words, what the actual source was (if known, many times it isn't), both for patient education, and as a safety issue, because septicemia is nothing to play with.

    I have the feeling that there was more to the story, because by the time you're actually septic, you would've known you were muy sick with something.

    And by the way, isopropyl alcohol doesn't kill much of anything (it's hell on yeasty bugs, sometimes). But you can use it after you wash equipment because it will displace most of any trapped water (assuming there is any), which could harbor and support bacteria, so it isn't a bad suggestion. Same for hydrogen peroxide, won't kill anything. (But, as part of Info"s contribution to chemistry/woodsy lore, it can be useful for a puncture wound, bubbles up debris that's otherwise hard to get to).

    And you didn't mention if you were diabetic, or have something else that can play with your immune system. All stuff to know. We don't need to know it, I hasten to add, but you do.

    Thanks for your post; it gives us the opportunity to visit a real issue with equipment, hygiene, and knowing the wider picture.

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  • greg_b
    replied
    Since you are washing it regularly and effectively, then have you thought about how long you leave it in place and whether you are tending to reduce fluid intake and/or holding your urine to reduce the number of times you have to take the device off and put it back on? Either of these could potentially contribute. You might try drinking more water and making sure you pee several times a day and your pee is mostly clear.

    Best

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  • Science Monk
    replied
    People who get frequent UTIs find D-mannose to be a very useful natural remedy. You can buy it at the health food store. D-mannose is the major active component of cranberry juice, which has been used as a folk remedy for UTIs for centuries.

    D-mannose is a simple sugar that we humans do not metabolize. It is excreted in the urine. D-mannose binds to the cell surface of bacteria in a way that, in turn, inhibits the ability of the bacteria to bind to the inner surfaces of your urinary tract. When the bacteria cannot bind to the surfaces of the urinary tract, they tumble about in the urine until flushing action of urination carries them out of the body.

    (Many companies sell D-mannose. I like the NOW Foods brand D-Mannose 500 mg-120 Vcaps. D-mannose is sweet. You can just take the caps as directed on the label, or you can open the caps and use the D-mannose to sweeten tea or foods. The last time I bought it off the shelf, I found it at Whole Foods Market for about $35 USD. It’s usually in the Women’s Health Section because women get most of the UTIs.)

    Read the rave reviews for D-mannose products on Amazon:
    https://www.amazon.com/D-mannose-Hea...=Now+D-mannose

    D-mannose is great for people who get frequent UTIs, and who prefer to treat themselves rather than relying upon the medical establishment. They say D-mannose works better than the antibiotics which mess up your entire system. D-mannose is more specific for bacterial UTIs than the antibiotics. Because D-mannose does not mess up your entire system, it can be used prophylactically whenever danger of UTI may be suspected, as well as a treatment once a UTI is established.

    The first symptoms of of a UTI are usually a burning or itching sensation upon urination, and a urgency to go frequently. Common reasons for this set of symptoms include:
    1) UTI
    2) kidney stone (or bladder stones, which are rarer)
    3) STD
    4) ruptured blood vessel in kidney
    The presence of any small particles in the urine, whether it be bacteria or you own blood cells, cause the burning or itching sensation and an urgency to go.

    However, if you also have fever and/or chills, don't go it alone. Report to a medical facility to get the antibiotics too. Use of D-mannose will not interfere with antibiotic therapy in any way. Fever and/or chills are a sign that the bacteria are migrating up your ureters to cause a kidney infection, which is very bad.

    If you have fever and/or chills, go to a medical facility whether you believe that you can afford to or not. You do not want to risk losing your precious kidneys. In the U.S., you WILL be given appropriate antibiotic treatment. It’s like a secret of state and a matter of socio-economic policy. It is much much cheaper for the social welfare system in the U.S. to treat every case of UTI that threatens the kidneys than for the government to ultimately pay for kidney dialysis if you lose your kidneys.

    David
    World As Monkey Island
    Last edited by Science Monk; 10-21-2017, 04:15 PM. Reason: typo

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