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2015-11-25 The Intercept - How the Gates Foundation Reflects the Good and the Bad of "Hacker Philanthropy"

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  • 2015-11-25 The Intercept - How the Gates Foundation Reflects the Good and the Bad of "Hacker Philanthropy"

    How the Gates Foundation Reflects the Good and the Bad of “Hacker Philanthropy”, Michael Massing, The Intercept, 25 November 2015
    https://theintercept.com/2015/11/25/...-philanthropy/

    The new breed [of "hacker" philanthropists] ... is anti-establishment, believes in “radical transparency,” is given to problem solving, and has an ability to identify weaknesses in long-established systems and to disrupt them. ... Interestingly, there are two members of the hacker elite who for 15 years now have practiced this style of philanthropy in a big way: Bill and Melinda Gates. ...
    Now Linsey McGoey, a sociologist at the University of Essex, is seeking to fill the gap. “Just how efficient is Gates’s philanthropic spending?” she asks in No Such Thing as a Free Gift. “Are the billions he has spent on U.S. primary and secondary schools improving education outcomes? Are global health grants directed at the largest health killers? Is the Gates Foundation improving access to affordable medicines, or are patent rights taking priority over human rights?” As the title of her book suggests, McGoey answers all of these questions in the negative. The good the foundation has done, she believes, is far outweighed by the harm. ...
    Bill and Melinda Gates answer to no electorate, board, or shareholders; they are accountable mainly to themselves. What’s more, the many millions of dollars the foundation has bestowed on nonprofits and news organizations has led to a natural reluctance on their part to criticize it. There’s even a name for it: the “Bill Chill” effect.
    This article is focussed on American education rather than health, and circumcision isn't mentioned (although HIV is).
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